Shoplifting

Shoplifting can be a misdemeanor or a felony, depending on certain factors, including the following.

Felony Shoplifting

If the value of the shoplifted property is $2,000 or more, it’s a class 5 felony.

If the shoplifting was done to “promote, further or assist any criminal street gang,” it’s a class 5 felony.

Shoplifting property with a value of $1,000 to $2,000 is a class 6 felony.

Shoplifting a firearm is generally a class 6 felony, regardless of value.

If you use an artifice, instrument, container, device or other article with the intent to facilitate shoplifting, it’s a class 4 felony.

If you commit shoplifting and have previously committed or been convicted within the past 5 years of 2 or more offenses involving burglary, shoplifting, robbery, organized retail theft or theft, it’s a class 4 felony.

Misdemeanor Shoplifting

Shoplifting property valued at less than $1,000 is a class 1 misdemeanor.

However, if a person is accused of having committed burglary, shoplifting, robbery, organized retail theft or theft, within the past 5 years, then it’s not a first time offense, and a misdemeanor shoplifting charge can quickly become a felony case.

Fines and Jail for Shoplifting

Felony shoplifting can lead to lengthy prison sentences.  A typical run-of-the-mill first-time shoplifting, under $1,000, class 1 misdemeanor, can have fines up to $2,500, plus surcharges, and up to 6 months jail, in addition to paying restitution.